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click here if you forgot your password February 9, 2009

Posted by That Guy in A Stunning Example of Synergy, Technology Trouble.
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Years and years ago, we were promised a paperless office. We were told that computers would be able to do everything we needed. We were told they would do it faster and better.

Well, at least computers can do everything we need, so long as we’re willing to program them that way. As for the faster and better part, that’s a long way off in some aspects. And we’ll never have a paperless office. People are too enamored of physical evidence of their work, physical signatures are always going to be required, and management for some reason doesn’t feel as though work is actually complete unless there’s a printed copy in the hands of management’s management.

Given how many different computer applications we’re forced to use, however, the least businesses could do is make things easier on us.

CC-licensed image by Flickr user Lana_aka_BADGRL

CC-licensed image by Flickr user Lana_aka_BADGRL

Some companies use as many as five different computer systems to just do basic corporate work. One for timekeeping, one that’s the actual application, one for security, one for e-mail, and one for record-keeping. And don’t forget the password just to log onto your office PC, the graphics department’s PC, the sales order system, and every password you’ve created for the consumer websites you need to use each day just to keep abreast of what’s going on in your industry.

Each account undoubtedly has different rules for usernames and passwords. Sometimes you have to use numbers and letters, sometimes you can use only one or the other; sometimes you have to change your password every 30 days, sometimes every 90; sometimes your username and password are locked by your company; sometimes you forget your passwords or get them confused with passwords for other applications. Most of the time, you get three shots to get your password right, and then you’re locked out until IT can get you back in.

No wonder we don’t have paperless offices: too many people are writing down all their passwords in a supposedly-safe location just to make sure they don’t forget them. After all, most people have to also remember a personal e-mail password along with usernames and passwords to all their online banking accounts and every website to which they belong. The same people who have long, involved passwords that are different for everything are often the people who aren’t too sanguine about using “save password” functions in their browsers.

From a programming standpoint, I don’t see how hard it could possibly be to set up a system where you log in through one portal (like a Cisco VPN) and have access to everything you need: timekeeping, record-keeping, bookkeeping, applications for business, e-mail maintenance, and so on. Why couldn’t you still keep everything on separate servers and just have one password to get in? Maybe you’d have to re-enter that password for each thing, but at least you’d only need to remember one. Corporate IT departments could require that it’s long and involved and has funny characters in it; it’s still only one password. At this point, I can’t count how many different systems the CorporateSpeak IT guys need to reset passwords for — often on a daily basis — without taking off my shoes.

We may never get to the ideal “paperless office”, but at least we can make it easier to log into our work computer systems. That’s an ideal we can aspire to. That’s an ideal we can achieve.

Can achieve. Knowing IT guys, probably won’t achieve, but it’d be nice.

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Comments»

1. Martina - September 1, 2014

Wow, that’s what I was exploring for, what a stuff! existing here at
this blog, thanks admin of this web page.


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