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the thanker August 18, 2009

Posted by That Guy in Staff.
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friendlydogThe Thanker. It’s inevitable that, at some point, you’ll have to help out someone at your office. It could be as trivial as reformatting an image file, or as involved as joining a committee because no one else will.

Just beware of the Thanker. You’ll never hear the end of it.

Let’s say, for example, that the Thanker took some photos and needs them run through Photoshop. He’s got to go out and shoot more photos, so he asks Ted to run them through Photoshop and leave them on his desk on a thumbdrive. He says, “thanks, Ted. I really appreciate it.” Ted says, “no problem” because it really isn’t one. Ted’s using Photoshop anyway, and it’s only a few pictures. He stays maybe five minutes later than usual to help the Thanker, then goes home feeling like he’s done his good deed for the day.

The next day, Ted’s got an e-mail thanking him again. And a voicemail. And when the Thanker comes in, he thanks Ted again.

Ted’s starting to feel uncomfortable. All he did was Photoshop a few pictures. He didn’t save anyone’s life.

Unfortunately for Ted, the discomfort is only beginning. Because the Thanker is going to look at those photos and thank Ted again. He’s going to give the photos to the graphic artist and mention how helpful Ted was. When he gets the layout back to review, he’s going to thank Ted again when he shows Ted how great the pictures look. He’s also going to thank John, who did the layout, but Ted’s really the focus here.

And when the ad shows up in a magazine or newspaper, the Thanker is going to thank Ted yet again, extolling him for simply Photoshopping ten or so pictures because he had to go do another photo shoot.

Ted’s not going to help the Thanker again. He’s going to make some sort of lame excuse to not help the Thanker next time because he doesn’t want to be the focus of all that approbation. Eventually the Thanker is going to run out of people who’ll help him, not because he’s being a dick about it, but because he’s too effusive with his praise. It works both ways, and he just doesn’t get that.

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Comments»

1. Scott - August 18, 2009

Thanks for this article!


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